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Mental Fitness 2018-07-10T16:56:02+00:00

Goal Group Purpose

To encourage and equip citizens in achieving and maintaining mental fitness.

  1. Build networks throughout the county to equip citizens in achieving resilience.
  2. Increase the practice of intentional choices to reduce stress and anxiety.
  3. Educate to increase the community knowledge on mental fitness so individuals can make positive choices regarding their overall health.

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

The following are a series of articles aimed at exploring the problem of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and their harmful effects on the physical, emotional and mental health of our community. Substantial public health research confirms that mistreatment of children results in a variety of problems for them as they grow into adulthood. Although the problems that result from ACEs create ripple effects throughout our communities, research shows that we can build resilience to the trauma caused by ACEs. Resilience trumps ACEs!

Mental Illness of a Parent
Addiction of a Parent
Domestic Violence
Physical Abuse
Emotional Neglect
Physical Neglect
Incarcerated Parents
Emotional Abuse
Sexual Abuse of Children
Divorce or Separation of a Parent

ARC (ACEs and Resilience Cohort)

Purpose: To achieve a healthier community through 1) public education about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and 2) promotion of resilience building knowledge and skills at the individual, family and community levels.

“Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences: ACE-Building-Self-Healing-Communities-Handout

Resources

Paper Tigers

Directed by JAMES REDFORD and Produced by KAREN PRITZKER  View Video»

“The documentary Paper Tigers shows what’s possible when schools talk to kids instead of suspending them.”
– Liz Dwyer, Culture and education editor for Take Part

Want to Get Troubled Teens on the College Track? Figure Out Why They Misbehave. Swearing at teachers, throwing chairs in a classroom, getting into fights on campus, or ditching class—those kinds of behaviors are sure to get students suspended, expelled, or handcuffed in the back of a squad car at most American high schools. But instead of responding with the typical punitive, zero-tolerance disciplinary tactics, what would happen if teachers and administrators started asking kids who act out what’s really going on in their lives? In Paper Tigers—a documentary that follows six troubled teens and the staff at Lincoln Alternative High School in rural Walla Walla, Washington—educators try a different approach: by recognizing that student misbehavior is usually the result of traumatic stress from being abused or neglected, kids’ lives are transformed.

Teaching Traumatized Kids
Some schools are using simple acts of kindness to support vulnerable students»

Resiliency Building Tools

Three Good Things notepad
Attitude of Gratitude tree
Attitude of Gratitude post-it notes
Resiliency bookmarks
A Guide to Healthy Sleep
9 Ways to Cultivate Gratitude

If your organization is interested in promoting an attitude of gratitude and borrowing a gratitude tree poster, request resources from a contact above.

How To Practice Random Acts of Kindness

Research has shown that performing an act of kindness produces the single most reliable momentary increase in well-being of any exercise that has been tested. We challenge you to find one wholly unexpected kind act to do — and simply do it! Participate in the following tools that were shared by Dr. Bryan Sexton during The Science of Resilience event on September 21, 2015:

Bounce Back Project
3 Good Things
Nov 9 2015
Gratitude Letters
Signature Strengths

Promoting Children’s Mental Health Video Resources

Mental Health: Yours, Mine and Ours
A Very Happy Brain
Three Parts of Your Brain
How Brains are Built

Meetings & Contact

The Mental Fitness Goal Group meets the second Thursday of the month at 7:45 am at Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center, 523 North 3rd St, Brainerd 56401.
To get involved with this Goal Group please email:
Nathan Bertram
Nathan.Bertram@crowwing.us
or

Tom Gonzalez at
tomgonzalez007@gmail.com
For more information on the ARC (ACEs and Resilience Cohort) please contact:
Lowell Johnson johnsonlowells@gmail.com
Tony Oltmann
Tony.Oltmann@lssmn.org
Tom Gonzalez tomgonzalez007@gmail.com
Crisis Line and Referral Service
A confidential, and non-judgmental 24/7 crisis line for people who need a listening ear, information, referral resources, or crisis mental health intervention because we envision all people having access to resources that help them to cope or solve their problems. 800-462-5525